GrowingForChrist

Faith, Family, Love and Reviews

Handlebar Review: Home for Christmas; Stories for Young and Old by various authors

on September 8, 2015

**This review has affiliate links if you click on the linked text and purchase it I will earn a small percentage of the sale which will help me as I raise my three children alone.**

About the Book:

For readers who are tired of Christmas commercialism, or who feel that Santa Claus and reindeer don’t tell the whole story, these classic gems provide a winning alternative. Selected for their insightfulness, spiritual value, and literary quality (nothing moralistic here) they project the spirit of the season in a fresh, compelling manner that will resonate with readers of all ages – from children too young to read to themselves, to parents and grandparents who enjoy reading stories aloud.

Home for Christmas includes time-tested favorites by some of the world’s most beloved children’s authors – Pearl Buck, Selma Lagerlöf, Henry van Dyke, Madeleine L’Engle, Elizabeth Goudge, Rebecca Caudill, and Ruth Sawyer – as well as little-known European stories appearing in English for the first time.

You can purchase Home for Christmas: Stories for Young and Oldon Amazon.

My Opinion:

**I’m late in getting this review done – it was due around the time of my husband’s passing – and I couldn’t bring myself to even read the book until now.**

Christmas……it’s a favorite time of year for me, the mystery of the Lord’s birth, the shepherds, the wise men, stars and all that comes with it. I tire of the commercials that scream, give me, give me, give me and the even less said, thank you. I sat down to read this in the summer and thought it would give me some peace and have me looking forward to the upcoming Christmas season that was so dear to me. With authors like Pearl Buck, Madeleine L’Engle and others one would expect this to be a high caliber reading of Christmas stories that one could indeed read to their children as well as maybe in a Sunday school setting, and some of the stories were that – some were quite good and pulled me in such as “Brother Robber” by Helene Christaller or “The Guest” by Nikolai S. Lesskov but some well, left me disappointed and skipping the entire story.

There were two stories in the book that used the liberal usage of d*** and h*** and I promptly quit reading those, I don’t care to use the language in my speech and therefor do not care to read it either. If you want to read this book to a younger audience I would definitely suggest pre-reading it and marking which stories are appropriate. Also of note for some of my readers there were a couple stories where the ‘bad’ people were drunk and/or drinking. Also, I want to say some do revolve around the Roman Catholic faith in which some ideas are strictly not Biblical (in no way saying Catholics aren’t Christian but there are so theologies I disagree with) such as works based salvation, Jesus showing up in a cottage to play a game of chess and statues of Mary and Jesus bleeding.

While there were a few stories I enjoyed, overall this is not a book I would highly recommend – especially if you’re looking for something as a family read aloud or to read in church – unless you do a lot of heavy editing. I enjoy tales that are almost forgotten and I do enjoy a good European author but this was not what I was expecting for Christmas stories, I wanted a good, theologically sound tale and most didn’t offer that even if a few did.

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